How Geothermal Works - Geothermal Process

A gas forced-air heating system goes into action when the thermostat tells it that the room temperature has dropped below a preset comfort level. The thermostat sends a low-voltage electrical signal to a relay in the furnace, which signals a valve to open and deliver natural gas to the burners and for the blower to turn on. 

The furnace’s pilot light or electronic ignition lights the burner inside the combustion chamber. This creates heat in the furnace’s heat exchanger, a metal chamber around which the moving air flows.

Once warmed, the air is pushed into the hot-air plenum and then out to the rooms through duct work. The combustion gases created by burning fuel are vented through a flue in the roof or, with high-efficiency furnaces, through a wall.

 

One of the benefits of a forced air system is that it can receive a whole-house air-conditioning unit, a humidifier, and an electronic air filter—all of which can take advantage of the furnace’s air handler and ducts for delivery of conditioned air to rooms. Duct work is generally metal wrapped with insulation that helps retain heat.

The following video will give you a clear idea of how every part of a furnace works to heat your home.

 

Heating and Cooling Cycles

During the heating cycle, the fluid circulates through the loop extracting heat from the ground. The heat energy is transferred to the geothermal unit. The unit compresses the extracted heat to a high temperature and delivers it to your home through a normal duct system or radiant heat system.

For cooling, the process is simply reversed. Because the earth is much cooler than the air temperatures on a hot day, the geothermal system removes heat from the home and deposits it into the ground. The fluid is cooled by the ground temperatures and returned to the unit for cooling your home.

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